Tennis elbow! Age strikes again…

This age-related body-bits falling off/falling apart thing is really beginning to catch up with me.

I’ve had a niggly pain in my left elbow for about a month, and yesterday it suddenly grew acutely painful. When it was worse this morning I nipped along to the GP, and he reckons I have tennis elbow. Heaven only knows what can have caused it, though a quick scan online does suggest that it can originate from repetitive wrist movements, so perhaps it could be something to do with using a keyboard. Hmmm…

Has anyone else had this? It’s in my left elbow, although I’m right-handed. The GP suggested Voltorol gel, since oral anti-inflammatories give me major gutrot. A Cortisone injection was mentioned as a possiblity if the symptoms don’t clear up 😦 I’ve heard they’re agonisingly painful, so I hope I don’t have to go there.

Advertisements

15 Responses to Tennis elbow! Age strikes again…

  1. Cortisone been there done that didn’t last a week
    Arnica not bad for instant relief http://www.avogel.co.uk/atrogel/?gclid=COHUqaz2g6kCFQNP4QodvQiuHQ
    but lasts about a day same with a bottle of red
    best wishes, Danny

  2. Lonewalker says:

    i suffered from this about three years ago – it lasted about 6 months then went away. I took Ibuprofen regularly for the whole time and that helped. 400mg dose three times a day with meals and it builds up in your system helping the symptoms.

    I’ve just started to get the same pains in the other arm and not looking forward to the next few months 😦

    • peewiglet says:

      Hi there.

      6 months is a long time. I spoke to a pal yesterday who’s had it in both elbows. For her the Cortisone injections helped, and she said they barely hurt at all, even though she claims to be a wimp with needles.

      I’m sorry to hear you’ve started to get it in the other arm 😦 It may be worth exploring the injection route if Ibruprofen doesn’t settle it quickly. My fingers are crossed for you.

  3. Theo says:

    Pardon my English but I’m not good in medical terms. I suppose it’s the point where your muscle is attached to your bone where it hurts. The cause can indeed be a repetitive movement like playing tennis, using a screwdriver, building/cementing a brick wall etc.. The latter was the cause with my injury. I used a velcro strap around the underarm muscle close to my elbow to create an ‘artificial’ fixed point for the underarm muscle. That way the strain was taken of the original, inflamatory, fixing point. I didn’t use painkillers but common sense and listened to my body what it could and certainly what it couldn’t do. It takes a while to gain full strenght again but it’s the natural way.

    Theo

    • peewiglet says:

      Hi Theo!

      Many thanks for that. It’s very helpful ♥

      How tight was the strap? Did you use it 24/7? How long did you continue with it?

      I can’t help wondering whether there’s something else going on with my arm, because my wrist has also been sore. Did you have that too? Certainly my elbow pain does seem to fit the ‘tennis elbow’ description, though.

  4. Theo says:

    The brace should be quite tight but be sure sure your blood keeps flowing. Best is to adjust according to fysical labour. If you bend your arm lifting something heavy your muscles will contract and get thicker thus making the brace feeling thighter and slowing down your bloodflow. I didn’t use the strap or very loose during the night or watching telly and the like. It’s mainly for taking the strain of the point were the muscle is attached to the bone. If you can pinpoint (litterally) the sore spot close to your elbow by putting force to it with the point of your finger you’ll almost certainly have a tendinitis (there are different muscles for different movements and ergo different tendinitisses). Because you use your arm differently now you can put too much strain on other parts of your arm, like your wrist. Depending on how long this has been going on it’ll take time to heal accordingly. From not being able to lift 1 kg without serious pain it took me 4-5 months to regain full power in my right arm. Use your brain while using your muscles.
    Warning : I’m not a doctor, results gained in the past are no garantee for the future.

    Yours,

    Theo

    • peewiglet says:

      Thanks again, Theo. I’ll definitely look into that.

      Did you find that the muscles (well, some of them) surrounding your elbow were also painful? And did you get any associated pain in your wrist? My arm was so sore y/day evening that I couldn’t even hold a pan in my left hand while attempting to dry it with my right. I had to tuck it under my arm.

  5. Theo says:

    The pain tends to ‘glow’ around the affected spot and while trying to lift the lightest things the wrong way (with the palm of your hand pointing down or the contrary pointing up) you can feel the pain from upperarm to you fingertips and you simply have to let go of things that seem lighter than air. It sounds like you have a serious case of tendinitis but go to your GP for confirmation. Taking about 10 tablets of painkiller per year I’m anti pills and injections but that’s my twopence.

    Theo

  6. Wendy says:

    I have had this problem and had to resort to Cortisone Injections from the Dr.It was a bit painful and afterwards my arm ached for a few hours afterwards,but found the problem cleared up quicker I think than what it would have done without the injection.I did read somwhere that if you do nothing,then it can be up to eighteen months before the problem clears up on it’s own.Rest will help but at the end of the day I found the needle the best…

    • peewiglet says:

      Thanks, Wendy 🙂 I’ll see how I get on for a week or so, and if there’s no significant improvement I may try the injection route. It’s difficult not being able to use my arm properly.

  7. Robert says:

    I had a problem with tendons in my wrist and this cured it really quickly. Take and look and try it out.

    http://www.ukclimbing.com/articles/page.php?id=3614

    • peewiglet says:

      This looks brilliant, thanks, Robert! I’ll get the kit tomorrow and have a go.

      Thank you very much indeed for drawing it to my attention ♥

      • Robert says:

        No problem. The key for me was geting to the “I found that immediately after the exercise the elbow felt better, sort of warm and numb.” bit. I got reduced pain and better movement within a few days, and back to normal after a couple of weeks. My injury had lasted 6 months prior to this caused by falling off a Mountain Bike. But I suppose it depends on how much damage there is to heal. Good Luck!

  8. football…

    Tennis elbow! Age strikes again… « Peewiglet's Plog…

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: